British Journal of Cancer

Cancer is a complex problem. The international effort to understand and control it involves clinicians trained in many branches of medicine and scientists from most biological disciplines, chemistry, pharmaceutical and physical sciences. British Journal of Cancer (BJC) exists to serve the needs of this diverse community, providing a forum for prompt communication of original and innovative research findings that have relevance to understanding the etiology of cancer and to improving the treatment and survival of patients. BJC works with a distinguished team of international experts to ensure the highest standards of selection and review. All relevant papers are carefully considered. Once accepted, papers are published rapidly in print and online.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United Kingdom
History
1947--present
Website
http://www.nature.com/bjc/index.html
Impact factor
6.176 (2016)

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Oncology & Cancer

6 healthy steps to preventing colon cancer

Colon cancer can be a devastating diagnosis, but there are a number of steps you can take to reduce your risk of tumors, an expert says.

Oncology & Cancer

First data in a decade highlights ethnic disparities in cancer

Cancer Research UK's latest analysis of NHS Digital cancer registration data uses the most complete recording to date of cancer rates by ethnicity in England, providing crucial data on how some cancer rates vary by ethnicity. ...

Medications

Scientists find link between antibiotics and colon cancer

Scientists from the University of Aberdeen, NHS Grampian and Queen's University Belfast have found that antibiotic use may increase the risk of developing colon cancer, potentially more so among younger people.

Medications

Common medication hindering lung cancer treatment

A common medication used to treat reflux, heart burn and ulcers could lessen the effectiveness of lung cancer immunotherapy drugs, according to new Flinders University research.

Medications

Triple-drug combo could prove key weapon in fight against cancer

Combining three existing drugs—a commonly-used anti-epileptic, a contraceptive steroid and a cholesterol-lowering agent—could form an effective and non-toxic treatment for a range of aggressive blood cancers, a new study ...

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