Cell

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing research papers across a broad range of disciplines within the life sciences. Areas covered include molecular biology, cell biology, systems biology, stem cells, developmental biology, genetics and genomics, proteomics, cancer research, immunology, neuroscience, structural biology, microbiology, virology, physiology, biophysics, and computational biology. The journal was established in 1974 by Benjamin Lewin and is published twice monthly by Cell Press, an imprint of Elsevier. Benjamin Lewin founded Cell in January 1974, under the aegis of MIT Press. He then bought the title and established an independent Cell Press in 1986. In April 1999, Lewin sold Cell Press to Elsevier. The "Article of the Future" feature was the recipient of a 2011 PROSE Award for Excellence in Biological & Life Sciences presented by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers. According to ScienceWatch, the journal was ranked first overall in the category of highest-impact journals (all fields) over 1995–2005 with an average of 161.2 citations per paper.

Publisher
Cell Press
History
1974–present
Website
http://www.cell.com/
Impact factor
32.401 (2010)

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Medical research

Sex, gender and the mechanisms of disease

Medical research did not always include women as participants or investigate the influence of sex and gender on health. This has now changed, and research is beginning to uncover ways in which sex as a biological variable ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Scientists explain what makes COVID-19 antibody 'J08' so potent

Last year, scientists at Scripps Research and Toscana Life Sciences studied the blood of 14 COVID-19 survivors to find the most potent antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. One of the leading molecules that emerged—now ...

Oncology & Cancer

Tracing a cancer's family tree to its roots reveals how tumors grow

Over time, cancer cells can evolve to become resistant to treatment, more aggressive, and metastatic—capable of spreading to additional sites in the body and forming new tumors. The more of these traits that a cancer evolves, ...

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