Cell

Cell is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing research papers across a broad range of disciplines within the life sciences. Areas covered include molecular biology, cell biology, systems biology, stem cells, developmental biology, genetics and genomics, proteomics, cancer research, immunology, neuroscience, structural biology, microbiology, virology, physiology, biophysics, and computational biology. The journal was established in 1974 by Benjamin Lewin and is published twice monthly by Cell Press, an imprint of Elsevier. Benjamin Lewin founded Cell in January 1974, under the aegis of MIT Press. He then bought the title and established an independent Cell Press in 1986. In April 1999, Lewin sold Cell Press to Elsevier. The "Article of the Future" feature was the recipient of a 2011 PROSE Award for Excellence in Biological & Life Sciences presented by the Professional and Scholarly Publishing Division of the Association of American Publishers. According to ScienceWatch, the journal was ranked first overall in the category of highest-impact journals (all fields) over 1995–2005 with an average of 161.2 citations per paper.

Publisher
Cell Press
History
1974–present
Website
http://www.cell.com/
Impact factor
32.401 (2010)

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Neuroscience

Exploring our sense of touch from every angle

Even before we are born and begin experiencing the sensations of daily life—a soft shirt on our arms, for example, or a hard tabletop under our fingertips—humans begin to form the senses needed to survive.

Endocrinology & Metabolism

Study reveals brown fat's role in protecting blood sugar metabolism

While white fat stores calories, brown fat burns them. A new study, appearing in the journal Cell, reveals that brown fat improves metabolic health by providing nutrients important to other organs, rather than warming up ...

Genetics

New insights on cellular clones and inflammation in bones

As humans age, hematopoietic stem cells—the immature precursor cells that give rise to all blood and immune cells—accumulate mutations. Some of the mutations allow these stem cells to self-renew and expand more effectively ...

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