Cognitive Neuroscience

Cognitive Neuroscience publishes high quality empirical and theoretical papers on any topic in the field of cognitive neuroscience including, but not limited to: perception, attention, memory, language, action, decision-making, emotions, and social cognition. We welcome papers that link together scientific theory with current clinical applications and future clinical translations.

Publisher
Taylor & Francis

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Psychology & Psychiatry

Emotionally charged facial expressions can influence actions

A face with an emotionally charged expression, especially if the emotion is anger, can influence the course of our actions, according to a study by the International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) of Trieste published ...

Neuroscience

Brain wave device enhances memory function

The entrainment of theta brain waves with a commercially available device not only enhances theta wave activity, but also boosts memory performance. That's according to new research from the Center for Neuroscience at the ...

Neuroscience

Trying, and failing, to forget has lasting effects

Listening to a traffic report before leaving for work or school may be part of your daily routine. But how does your brain sort through the entire report and only recall the fastest route to your destination, and then forget ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Parental touch may reduce social anxiety in children

Parental touch reduces children's attention to social threat and increases trust, particularly in socially anxious children. As a result, parental touch may reduce children's social anxiety. These are the conclusions drawn ...

Health

Young marijuana users respond differently to social exclusion

A new study published in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that young adults who regularly use marijuana display altered brain activation patterns during social exclusion.

Neuroscience

New insights into the adolescent brain

The inner workings of the teenage brain are now slightly less mysterious, thanks to a research team led by University of Delaware engineers.

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