Current Biology

Current Biology is a scientific journal that covers all areas of biology, especially molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, neurobiology, ecology and evolutionary biology. The journal is published twice a month and includes peer-reviewed research articles, various types of review articles, as well as an editorial magazine section. Current Biology was founded in 1991 by the Current Science group, acquired by Elsevier in 1998 and has since 2001 been part of Cell Press, a subdivision of Elsevier.

Publisher
Cell Press
Country
United States
History
1991–present
Impact factor
10.777 (2008)

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Neuroscience

Study finds hub linking movement and motivation in the brain

Our everyday lives rely on planned movement through the environment to achieve goals. A new study by MIT neuroscientists at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory identifies a well-connected brain region as a crucial ...

Neuroscience

Perception of musical pitch varies across cultures

People who are accustomed to listening to Western music, which is based on a system of notes organized in octaves, can usually perceive the similarity between notes that are same but played in different registers—say, high ...

Neuroscience

Researchers hone in on the elusive receptor for sour taste

Sour is the taste of summer, a taste that evokes lemonade stands and vine-ripe tomatoes. Among the five basic tastes—the others being bitter, sweet, salty and umami—it is arguably the most subtle. In small amounts, it ...

Neuroscience

How can ultrasonic brain stimulation cure brain diseases?

Just as rays of sunlight can be focused by a magnifying glass, beams of ultrasound can be focused—not to start a fire, but to converge on a specific target. The pulses of ultrasound are able to pass through obstructions ...

Genetics

DNA changes accelerate body's aging process

DNA changes throughout a person's life can significantly increase their susceptibility to heart conditions and other age-related diseases, research suggests.

Neuroscience

New method classifies brain cells based on electrical signals

For decades, neuroscientists have relied on a technique for reading out electrical "spikes" of brain activity in live, behaving subjects that tells them very little about the types of cells they are monitoring. In a new study, ...

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