European Urology

European Urology, the official journal of the EAU, has been a prestigious urological forum for over 35 years, and is currently read by more than 20,000 urologists across the globe. With an impact factor of 8.843, the journal has become the leading scientific publication in the field.

Publisher
European Association of Urology
Impact factor
8.843 (2010)

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Oncology & Cancer

Study supports PSA screening for male BRCA2 carriers

(HealthDay)—Systematic prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening is advised for men who are carriers of the BRCA2 mutation, which is associated with a higher incidence of prostate cancer, younger age at diagnosis, and clinically ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Research points to new treatment for prostate condition

An unexpected discovery by scientists at the University of York could potentially pave the way for new treatments for benign enlargement of the prostate, a condition which affects more than 200 million men worldwide.

Oncology & Cancer

First clear evidence of a link between smoking and prostate cancer

Smoking is a known risk factor for the development of various forms of cancer. However, when it comes to the link between smoking and prostate cancer, the findings of previous studies have been contradictory. Now, for the ...

Oncology & Cancer

Urine-based test improves on PSA for detecting prostate cancer

A new urine-based test improved prostate cancer detection - including detecting more aggressive forms of prostate cancer - compared to traditional models based on prostate serum antigen, or PSA, levels, a new study finds.

Oncology & Cancer

Increased risk of prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 gene fault

Men with the BRCA2 gene fault have an increased risk of prostate cancer and could benefit from PSA (prostate specific antigen) testing to help detect the disease earlier, according to researchers funded by Cancer Research ...

Health

Study debunks common misconception that urine is sterile

Bacteria have been discovered in the bladders of healthy women, discrediting the common belief that normal urine is sterile. This finding and its implications were addressed in an editorial published by researchers from Loyola ...

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