Health Affairs

Health Affairs is a peer-reviewed healthcare journal established in 1981 by John K. Iglehart; since 2007, the editor-in-chief is Susan Dentzer. It was described by The Washington Post as "the bible of health policy". Health Affairs is indexed and/or abstracted in PubMed, MEDLINE, EBSCO databases, ProQuest, LexisNexis, Current Contents/Health Sciences and Behavioral Sciences, and SwetsWise Online Content. Narrative Matters is a personal-essay section. It was established in 1999 with Fitzhugh Mullan (George Washington University) as its original editor. Since 2006, it has been edited by Ellen Ficklen. During its 12 years of history, Narrative Matters has published over 160 policy narratives on a wide-range of topics by well-known writers including Julia Alvarez, Alexander McCall Smith, and Abraham Verghese, by distinguished medical professionals and academics, as well as by patients. In 2006, the Johns Hopkins University Press published a selection of essays from Narrative Matters: "Narrative Matters: The Power of the Personal Essay in Health Policy" (eds. Fitzhugh Mullan, Ellen Ficklen, Kyna Rubin). Since its inception, Narrative Matters has been funded by the W. K. Kellogg

Publisher
Project HOPE - The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.
Country
United States
History
1981-present
Website
http://www.healthaffairs.org/
Impact factor
3.582 (2009)

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