Journal of Happiness Studies

The Journal of Happiness Studies is a peer reviewed scientific journal devoted to subjective well-being. It covers both cognitive evaluations of life (like life-satisfaction), and affective enjoyment of life (such as mood level). Next to contributions on appraisal of life-as-a-whole, the journal accepts contributions on life domains (such as job-satisfaction) and life-aspects (such as perceived meaning of life).

Impact factor
1.875 (2011)

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Psychology & Psychiatry

A simple strategy to improve your mood in 12 minutes

We all have a remedy – a glass of wine or a piece of chocolate – for lifting our spirits when we're in a bad mood. Rather than focusing on ways to make ourselves feel better, a team of Iowa State University researchers ...

Health

Study: Get moving to get happier

Physical activity has long been known to reduce depression and anxiety, and is commonly prescribed to prevent or cure negative mental health conditions.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How passionate people respond when good things happen

A new Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management study found that the ways in which passionate people respond when good things happen in their favourite activities depends on their predominant passion type.

Psychology & Psychiatry

What makes a happy working mom?

A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Single motherhood does not make women unhappy

(Medical Xpress)—Raising a child outside of marriage poses many challenges – but does not have a negative impact on women's happiness, according to new research published in the Journal of Happiness Studies.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Resilience in trying times—a result of positive actions

Communities that stick together and do good for others cope better with crises and are happier for it, according to a new study by John Helliwell, from the University of British Columbia in Canada, and colleagues¹. Their ...

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