Journal of Neuroscience

The Journal of Neuroscience is a weekly scientific journal published by the Society for Neuroscience. The journal publishes peer-reviewed empirical research articles in the field of neuroscience. Its editor-in-chief is John Maunsell, a Boston-based neuroscientist specializing in the visual cortex. Volume 1 appeared in 1981 and issues appeared monthly; as its popularity grew it switched to a bimonthly in 1996 and then to a weekly in July, 2003. Articles appear within one of the following four sections of the journal: In addition, some issues of the journal contain articles in the following sections:

Publisher
Society for Neuroscience
Country
United States
History
1981--present
Website
http://www.jneurosci.org/
Impact factor
7.271 (2010)

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Neuroscience

How the brain creates the experience of time

On some days, time flies by, while on others it seems to drag on. A new study from JNeurosci reveals why: time-sensitive neurons get worn out and skew our perceptions of time.

Neuroscience

Brain estrogen is key to brain protection when oxygen is low

When the brain isn't getting enough oxygen, estrogen produced by neurons in both males and females hyperactivates another brain cell type called astrocytes to step up their usual support and protect brain function.

Neuroscience

Brain protein linked to seizures, abnormal social behaviors

A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside has found a new mechanism responsible for the abnormal development of neuronal connections in the mouse brain that leads to seizures and abnormal ...

Neuroscience

New form of brain analysis engages whole brain for the first time

A new method of brain imaging analysis offers the potential to greatly improve the effectiveness of noninvasive brain stimulation treatment for Alzheimer's, obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, and other conditions. ...

Neuroscience

Before eyes open, they get ready to see

A KAIST research team's computational simulations demonstrated that the waves of spontaneous neural activity in the retinas of still-closed eyes in mammals develop long-range horizontal connections in the visual cortex during ...

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