Journal of Psychosomatic Research

The Journal of Psychosomatic Research is a multidisciplinary research journal covering all aspects of the relationships between psychology and medicine. The scope is broad and ranges from basic human biological and psychological research to evaluations of treatment and services. Papers will normally be concerned with illness or patients rather than studies of healthy populations. Studies concerning special populations, such as the elderly and children and adolescents, are welcome. In addition to peer-reviewed original papers, the journal publishes editorials, reviews, and other papers related to the journal's aims.

Publisher
Elsevier
Website
http://www.journals.elsevier.com/journal-of-psychosomatic-research/

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Psychology & Psychiatry

New inventory resource measures severity of work-related depression

First came their pioneering research a few years ago linking burnout and depression. Now City College of New York psychologist Irvin Sam Schonfeld and his University of Neuchâtel collaborator Renzo Bianchi present the Occupational ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Figuring out what happened in a psychotherapy intervention trial

John Ioannidis, the "scourge of sloppy science" has documented again and again that the safeguards being introduced into the biomedical literature against untrustworthy findings are usually inconsistent and ineffective. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Mindfulness-based depression therapy reduces health care visits

A mindfulness-based therapy for depression has the added benefit of reducing health-care visits among patients who often see their family doctors, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Spouse's sunny outlook may be good for your health

(HealthDay)—Marriage vows often include the promise to stick together for better or for worse, and research now suggests that when it comes to your health, having an optimistic spouse is better.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Media health warnings trigger symptoms from sham exposure

(HealthDay)—Individuals who watched a news report about the adverse health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) were more likely to experience symptoms after a 15-minute sham exposure to a WiFi signal than ...

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