Journal of the American Heart Association

Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA) is an authoritative, peer-reviewed Open Access journal focusing on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. JAHA provides a global forum for basic and clinical research and timely reviews on cardiovascular disease and stroke. As an Open Access journal, its content is free on publication to read, download, and share, accelerating the translation of strong science into effective practice.

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Cardiology

Breastfeeding may help a mom's heart

Studies have long touted the benefits of breastfeeding for infants, including stronger immune systems and lower risk for asthma, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. But babies aren't the only ones benefiting: Nursing also appears ...

Cardiology

Calcium specks may help detect heart disease in South Asians

Specks of calcium in the heart's artery walls could be an important prognostic marker of early cardiovascular disease in South Asians and may help guide treatment in this population, according to a study by researchers at ...

Cardiology

Women with CVD have worse self-reported outcomes

(HealthDay)—Compared with men, women with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) are more likely to report poorer patient experience, lower health-related quality of life, and poorer perception of their health, ...

Cardiology

Blood pressure medication can't undo all damage

Treating out-of-control blood pressure with antihypertensive medication can greatly reduce your risk for heart attack, stroke and heart failure, but the current approach to treatment can't undo all of the previous damage ...

Cardiology

Your weight history may predict your heart failure risk

In a medical records analysis of information gathered on more than 6,000 people, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conclude that simply asking older adult patients about their weight history at ages 20 and 40 could provide ...

Cardiology

Exercise after heart attack may improve survival

Exercising after a heart attack, even a long walk around the neighborhood, can be frightening for survivors. But those fears may be eased by new research that found regular physical activity could help keep them alive.

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