Lancet Neurology

The Lancet is a weekly peer-reviewed general medical journal. It is one of the world s best known, oldest, and most respected general medical journals. The Lancet was founded in 1823 by Thomas Wakley, an English surgeon who named it after the surgical instrument called a lancet, as well as after the term "lancet arch", a window with a sharp pointed arch, to indicate the "light of wisdom" or "to let in light". It publishes original research articles, review articles ("seminars" and "reviews"), editorials, book reviews, correspondence, as well as news features and case reports. The Lancet has been owned by Elsevier since 1991. As of 1995, the editor-in-chief is Richard Horton. The journal has editorial offices in London, New York, and Beijing. In the 2010 Journal Citation Reports, The Lancet s impact factor was ranked second among general medical journals, at 33.63, after The New England Journal of Medicine (53.48). The Lancet also has several speciality journals all bearing the parent title: The Lancet Neurology (neurology), The Lancet Oncology (oncology), and The Lancet Infectious Diseases (infectious diseases), all of which publish original research and reviews. These three

Publisher
Elsevier
History
1823–present
Impact factor
33.633 (2010)

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Medical research

Paralysed man walks again with brain-controlled exoskeleton

A French man paralysed in a night club accident can walk again thanks to a brain-controlled exoskeleton in what scientists said Wednesday was a breakthrough providing hope to tetraplegics seeking to regain movement.

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Exercising at home has a positive effect on Parkinson's patients

In a large double-blind study, Radboud university medical center researchers show that patients in the early stages of Parkinson's disease can exercise regularly at home for 6 months. This regular exercise has a positive ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Accuracy of dementia brain imaging must improve

MRI scans and other tools to detect and diagnose dementia are helpful but not definitive - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

Medical research

UK study finds diaphragm pacing not beneficial to MND patients

A pioneering trial investigating the safety and efficacy of diaphragm pacing used to alleviate breathing difficulties for people with motor neurone disease (MND), has revealed the intervention is not generally beneficial ...

Neuroscience

Simple blood test unmasks concussions absent on CT scans

Many patients with concussion have normal CT scans and are discharged from the hospital without follow-up. But a blood test that is currently under development and costs a fraction of the price of a brain scan may flag concussion ...

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