Nature Genetics

Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world s most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts. The remainder of the journal consists mostly of research articles, which are

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group
Country
United States
History
1992–present
Website
http://www.nature.com/ng/index.html
Impact factor
36.377 (2010)

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Oncology & Cancer

New regulator of prostate cancer metastasis discovered

A transcription factor normally associated with androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer has a newly discovered role in controlling lipid biosynthesis, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in Nature Genetics.

Genetics

Exploring autoimmunity's regulatory roots

Our genome contains vast networks that regulate the activity of protein-coding genes. Variations in this regulatory DNA (which does not encode proteins) may affect both when and how much of a given protein a cell produces. ...

Genetics

Are you physically less likely to become infected with COVID-19?

Three newly-defined phenotypes (observable characteristics or traits for an individual) that capture genetic associations which may provide protection against SARS-CoV-2, are presented in a study published in Nature Genetics. ...

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