Obesity

Formerly known as Obesity Research, Obesity is the official journal of The Obesity Society. Available in print and online, Obesity is dedicated to increasing knowledge, fostering research, and promoting better treatment for people with obesity and their loved ones. Obesity publishes important peer-reviewed research, cutting-edge reviews, commentaries, and public health and medical developments.

Publisher
Nature Publishing Group

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Overweight & Obesity

New reports provide guidance for obesity care

Advocates for obesity prevention and treatment have designed two new resources for medical educators, healthcare providers and community programs that will enhance the level of care for patients, according to two new studies ...

Overweight & Obesity

Timing of exercise may be key to successful weight loss

In a study of 375 adults who have successfully maintained weight loss and who engage in moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity, most reported consistency in the time of day that they exercised, with early morning ...

Overweight & Obesity

Could that before-dinner drink make you eat more?

(HealthDay)—Having a drink before dinner really may make some people eat more—by focusing the brain's attention on food aromas, a small study suggests.

Overweight & Obesity

Do mini-packaged snacks help you eat less junk?

In recent years countless food manufacturers have been "sub-packaging" their foods into smaller portions in an apparent effort to curb folks from overindulging. You can usually find 100 kcal multi-packs of chips, pretzels, ...

Overweight & Obesity

Most adolescents feel better after gastric bypass

Teenagers suffering from severe obesity generally feel worse than their peers, but after undergoing gastric bypass nearly all experience improved mental health. One in five, however, still suffers from symptoms of depression ...

Overweight & Obesity

Do you really think you're a foodie?

Think you're a foodie? Adventurous eaters, known as "foodies," are often associated with indulgence and excess. However, a new Cornell Food and Brand Lab study shows just the opposite -adventurous eaters weigh less and may ...

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