PLoS ONE

PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available.

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)

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Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Verbal autopsies capture more accurate burden of disease in Uganda

Training community health workers to perform verbal autopsy interviews captured more accurate and complete data about the number and causes of deaths in a rural sub-county of Uganda than current health facility-dependent ...

Medical research

Researchers speed up detection of blood infection

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have developed a new method of detecting blood infection that they hope will dramatically speed up diagnosis and treatment of severe infection.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Effects of teenage motherhood may last multiple generations

The grandchildren of adolescent mothers have lower school readiness scores than their peers, according to a study published February 6, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Elizabeth Wall-Wieler of Stanford University ...

Medications

Drug microdosing effects may not measure up to big expectations

Taking very small amounts of psychedelic substances on a regular basis – called 'microdosing' – may improve psychological and cognitive functioning, but the effects do not exactly match users' expectations, a new study ...

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