Study finds male birth control pill safe

April 29, 2006

A British study finds that male contraceptive pills appear to be a safe and effective means of birth control.

A trial involving 1,500 men found that sperm levels recovered within a little more than three months of going off the pill, Sky News reported. The findings were published in the journal The Lancet.

"These findings thereby increase the promise of new contraceptive drugs allowing men to share more fairly the satisfaction and burden of family planning," Peter Liu of the University of Sydney said.

Fred Wu of the University of Manchester told the Daily Mail he expects a pill for men to be on the market within five to eight years.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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