In Brief: Tiny infant strong enough to go home

June 28, 2006

A premature baby who weighed only 1 pound 8 ounces when he was born has gone home after seven months in a Liverpool hospital.

Leyton Duke-McKenna was smaller than a can of cola when he born nearly 16 weeks early last November. He had only a 50 percent chance of survival, the Liverpool Echo reported.

His mother Paula told the Echo, "He has gone through more in his short life than many people would do in an entire lifetime."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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