Viagra studied for multiple uses

June 23, 2006
Viagra pill

California researchers have discovered entirely new applications for Viagra, the first erectile dysfunction drug to win federal approval.

An article in the current issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology said altitude researchers have been testing Viagra for use by both high performance athletes and soldiers after its approval to treat pulmonary hypertension, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Pulmonary hypertension, or high fluid pressure in the lungs, is caused by exercise in oxygen-poor environments. As blood vessels in the lungs constrict, the heart has to work harder to pump blood through the body.

Researchers at Stanford University and the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System had test subjects ride stationary bicycles for six kilometers and breath through masks to simulate low-oxygen conditions found at 12,700 feet.

The subjects given Viagra improved their times an average of 39 percent.

The Times said military researchers are now considering a study to see whether Viagra could help soldiers function better at high altitudes like the mountains of Afghanistan.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Hair loss and prostate drug linked to persistent erectile dysfunction in men

Related Stories

Viagra ads target women for first time

September 30, 2014

The maker of the world's top-selling erectile dysfunction drug on Tuesday will begin airing the first Viagra TV commercial in America that targets the less-obvious sufferers of the sexual condition: women.

Viagra protects the heart beyond the bedroom

October 20, 2014

Viagra could be used as a safe treatment for heart disease, finds new research published today in the open access journal BMC Medicine. The study reveals that long-term daily treatment of Viagra can provide protection for ...

US regulators to discuss 'female Viagra'

June 4, 2015

A drug nicknamed the "female Viagra" because it could help increase women's sex drive, will be discussed for a third time at a meeting of an advisory committee to US regulators Thursday.

Recommended for you

Dogs detect breast cancer from bandage: researchers

March 24, 2017

Dogs can sniff out cancer from a piece of cloth which had touched the breast of a woman with a tumour, researchers said Friday, announcing the results of an unusual, but promising, diagnostic trial.

Gene discovered associated with Tau pathology

March 24, 2017

Investigators at Rush University Medical Center and the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston reported the discovery of a new gene that is associated with susceptibility to a common form of brain pathology called Tau that ...

'Jumonji' protein key to Ewing's sarcoma rampage

March 24, 2017

By the time Ewing's Sarcoma is diagnosed, primarily in teens and young adults, it has often spread from its primary site to other parts of the body, making it difficult to treat. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.