Booze, smoking killing more women

July 30, 2006

The number of women dying from causes related to drinking and smoking rose to record levels in Scotland last year.

Male deaths from the same causes dropped, The Scotsman reported, keeping up a trend that has continued for several years.

Gillian Bell of Alcohol Focus Scotland said social trends that began in the 1960s and 1970s are making themselves felt. She said bars have become friendlier to woman patrons and alcohol sellers now target women.

"Women need to realize their drinking limits are lower. Their bodies cannot handle it and their livers are more damaged if they drink too much," she said.

Men are still more likely than women to die of smoking and alcohol-related disease, but if current trends continue that could change, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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