Camera may hold key to blindness

July 29, 2006

A new camera invented by British Dr. Andy McNaughts could help adults who suffer from glaucoma or diabetes save their vision, it was reported.

The camera invented by the Gloucestershire doctor can measure the back of the retina's oxygen levels and therefore give doctors advance warning of the onset of the potentially blinding diseases, the BBC reported.

"There isn't anything like it at the moment worldwide," the Cheltenham General Hospital surgeon said. "It will be a welcome piece of equipment for ophthalmologists across the country."

The camera is a non-invasive procedure to test the eye's circulation and could offer patients a better alternative than the previous technique of injecting a fluorescent dye into the eyes.

More than 171 million people worldwide have diabetes and glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in the world.

The camera is being tested at the Cheltenham General Hospital, which has begun using a prototype of McNaughts' invention, the BBC said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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