Impotence gel would rival Viagra

July 5, 2006
Viagra pill

A British-based pharmaceutical company says it plans to introduce an impotence gel that would rival Viagra.

The non-prescription gel -- to enter into clinical trials later this year -- is designed to be applied directly to the penis for the treatment of erectile dysfunction, The Times of London reported.

The gel -- being developed by Britain's Futura Medical Plc in collaboration with GlaxoSmithKline in the United States -- would compete with Pfizer Inc.'s Viagra in the multi-billion dollar anti-impotence market, the newspaper said.

The product is based on glyceryl trinitrate, currently used to treat angina. Viagra was also originally developed as a heart drug, but during clinical trials was found to be effective in treating erectile dysfunction. Viagra has been prescribed to more than 23 million men worldwide since it was introduced in 1998.

About 1,500 men are expected to be recruited into three clinical trials of the gel that, if given regulatory approval, would be available by 2009, the Times reported, noting the trials will also involve the study of its effects on women who would come into contact with the gel during sex.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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