Italians drinking less wine

July 6, 2006

Researchers say the amount of wine Italians drink has fallen considerably over the past 30 years.

The survey by the Doxa research agency counters recent alarms about a surge in youth binge drinking, ANSA reported.

Survey chief Allaman Allamani said that while Italians in their late teens and 20s are drinking more, "they tend to get back to traditional Mediterranean habits as early as their 40s."

The amount of wine Italians drink has dropped about 50 percent to about three glasses of wine a day over the last 30 years.

While young people are drinking more beer, wine remains the favorite alcoholic beverage of the 93 percent of the population who are drinkers.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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