Study: Botulinum toxin heals facial scars

August 8, 2006

U.S. scientists say treating facial wounds during the early healing phase with botulinum toxin -- Botox -- improves the later appearance of scars.

"Our findings show that botulinum toxin offers an additional tool in preventing the formation of bad scars," said Dr. Holger Gassner, lead study researcher and former Mayo Clinic ear, nose and throat surgical resident. Gassner is currently a fellow in facial plastic surgery at the University of Washington.

"It will give us the option to optimize healing of forehead wounds in the first place and possibly allow us to avoid later surgeries to improve the scar's appearance," Gassner said.

The researchers say Botox is the first medication found to minimize scarring. They said an injection with botulinum toxin early after the occurrence of a wound -- such as trauma from a dog bite or motor vehicle accident -- paralyzes the region, creating a smooth surface in which the wound can heal. That prevents muscle movement from wrinkling the wound site, allowing for a flat surface for healing and leaving a smoother final scar.

The study is outlined in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Hello, gorgeous! 'Pulse' technology may replenish skin's collagen

Related Stories

Hello, gorgeous! 'Pulse' technology may replenish skin's collagen

June 30, 2015
Americans spend over $10 billion a year on products and surgery in their quest to find a "fountain of youth," with little permanent success. Botulinum toxin—notably Botox—which smoothes lines and wrinkles to rejuvenate ...

Recommended for you

Separate brain systems cooperate during learning, study finds

February 21, 2018
A new study by Brown University researchers shows that two different brain systems work cooperatively as people learn.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Scientists discover critical molecular biomarkers of preeclampsia

February 21, 2018
Preeclampsia, a sudden pregnancy complication that can interfere with the blood flow to the placenta and possibly to the fetus, can lead to low birth weight, prematurity and even death. It is also a leading cause of maternal ...

Neuroimaging reveals lasting brain deficits in iron-deficient piglets

February 21, 2018
Iron deficiency in the first four weeks of a piglet's life - equivalent to roughly four months in a human infant - impairs the development of key brain structures, scientists report. The abnormalities remain even after weeks ...

Team provides insight into glucagon's role in diabetic heart disease

February 21, 2018
A UT Southwestern study reveals the hormone glucagon's importance to the development of insulin resistance and cardiac dysfunction during Type 2 diabetes, presenting opportunities to develop new therapies for diabetic diseases ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.