Australians living longer, but ...

September 1, 2006

Australians are living longer but a new study shows that disability rates are rising among the aged.

Research published by the Institute of Health and Welfare says that while Australians are living up to two years longer than they were in 1988, more people are suffering disabilities later in life.

On average, non-Indigenous Australian men have gained two years of life and those born in 2003 can expect to live until they are 77, the institute said. Women can expect to live to 82 years of age, a gain of one year over previous data.

The institute said, however, that the extra years gained may be a challenge to health authorities because more people get disabilities later in life. In the case of women, up to 20 years will be spent living with a disability, the report said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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