Man spends 48 days between hearts

September 9, 2006

A Miami man received a second heart transplant recently after spending 48 days without a heart.

Louis Quarterman appeared with his doctor at a news conference this week. He has been in intensive care at Jackson Memorial Hospital since the operation in June, the Miami Herald reported, but Dr. Si Pham said he is now ready for a transfer to rehab.

Quarterman received a transplanted kidney at the same time.

Pham removed Quarterman's heart 48 days before the surgery because the immunosuppressive drugs he needed to take were speeding the failure of his kidneys. Until he received the transplant, machines kept Quarterman's blood circulating.

"His body went through a lot," Pham said. "He did remarkably well."

Quarterman had his first heart transplant at age 49. That heart gave out 12 years later.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

Related Stories

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

January 10, 2018
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery ...

Kidney injury common after non-kidney transplants in children

January 9, 2018
(HealthDay)—In children who receive a non-kidney solid organ transplant, acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in the first year after surgery and is associated with an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), according ...

The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation: 50 years of heart transplantation progress

December 4, 2017
This month marks the 50th anniversary of the world's firrst human heart transplant performed at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town by South African surgeon, Christiaan Barnard. He transplanted the heart of a 25-year-old ...

Behind the drama of the world's first heart transplant

November 30, 2017
It was an operation that earned him acclaim, but the world's first heart transplant also provoked hate mail and outspoken criticism of South African surgeon Christiaan Barnard, 50 years ago.

The world's first organ transplants

November 30, 2017
Fifty years after the first heart transplant in South Africa, here is look back over the history of human organ transplants.

The man with a young woman's heart

November 30, 2017
Fifty years ago South Africa stunned the world: A surgeon in Cape Town, Christiaan Barnard, successfully transplanted the heart of a woman into the chest of a dying man.

Recommended for you

Curcumin improves memory and mood, study says

January 23, 2018
Lovers of Indian food, give yourselves a second helping: Daily consumption of a certain form of curcumin—the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color—improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related ...

Priming can negate stressful aspects of negative sporting environments, study finds

January 23, 2018
The scene is ubiquitous in sports: A coach yells at players, creating an environment where winning is the sole focus and mistakes are punished. New research from the University of Kansas shows that when participants find ...

Where you live may influence whether you are overweight, study finds

January 23, 2018
The old real estate adage of "location, location, location" may also apply to obesity.

Social and emotional skills linked to better student learning

January 23, 2018
Students with well-developed and adaptive social and emotional behaviours are most likely to excel in school, according to UNSW researchers in educational psychology.

Forces from fluid in the developing lung play an essential role in organ development

January 23, 2018
It is a marvel of nature: during gestation, multiple tissue types cooperate in building the elegantly functional structures of organs, from the brain's folds to the heart's multiple chambers. A recent study by Princeton researchers ...

Researchers identify a protein that keeps metastatic breast cancer cells dormant

January 23, 2018
A study headed by ICREA researcher Roger Gomis at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has identified the genes involved in the latent asymptomatic state of breast cancer metastases. The work sheds light ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.