Sperm mixup goes to U.S. court

September 27, 2006

A dispute between a man and the woman who may have had his child after a fertility clinic mistake is now in the hands of an Oregon judge.

At a hearing on Monday, a lawyer for the man, identified only as M.H., argued that his client has the right to know if he is a father, The Oregonian reported Tuesday.

The trouble began when M.H. contributed a sperm sample at the Oregon Health and Science University fertility clinic for his fiancee. His sperm was mistakenly inserted in a patient identified only as Jane Doe.

The lawyer representing Jane Doe and her husband argued that it is highly unlikely that M.H. fathered her child since the clinic had her take the morning after pill once staffers learned of the mistake. The lawyer also argued that under Oregon law a married woman's husband is legally the father of a child conceived by artificial insemination.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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