Cola may contribute to osteoporosis

October 7, 2006

Women who drink cola four times a week may be more susceptible to osteoporosis, researchers in Massachusetts reported.

The researchers at Tufts University said there is no evidence that an occasional cola will hurt bones, but women may want to watch their intake until more studies are conducted, WebMD.com said Friday.

The study of men and women just under age 60 found that cola consumption seemed to be linked to lower bone mineral density at three hip sites in women, but not in the spine.

Men did not show a lower bone mineral density. Results were similar for diet and decaffeinated colas as well.

Men reported drinking an average of six soft drinks -- five of them colas -- each week. Women reported drinking five carbonated drinks a week, four of which were colas.

Researchers said results should be viewed cautiously because it was not determined why women who drank more cola had lower bone mineral density. However, women who drank more cola tended to consume less calcium and fruit juice, which may contribute to lower density.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

Related Stories

Coke to defend safety of aspartame in new ad

August 13, 2013
Coca-Cola plans to run its first ad defending the safety of artificial sweeteners on Wednesday, a move that comes as the company looks to stem declining sales of diet soda.

Could caffeine help prevent dementia?

October 3, 2016
A new study suggests a significant relationship between caffeine and dementia prevention, though it stops short of establishing cause and effect.

For whom the births (and worms) toll

July 22, 2016
Human childbirth is not only unpleasant, it's also assumed to take a toll on women's health, even while women have a greater life expectancy. A new study led by UC Santa Barbara researchers, however, finds that indigenous ...

Minority children drink more sugary fruit juice than their white peers

May 30, 2013
While there has been a steep decline in kids' consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages in California, African-American and Latino children may be replacing soda with 100 percent fruit juice while their white peers are not, ...

Sugar-sweetened beverages associated with increased kidney stone risk

May 15, 2013
Twenty percent of American males and 10 percent of American females will experience a kidney stone at some point in their lifetime. Often, these patients will be advised to drink more fluids as a way to prevent future stone ...

Regular intake of sugary beverages, but not diet soda, is associated with prediabetes

November 9, 2016
Adult Americans who regularly consumed sugar-sweetened beverages (roughly one can of soda per day) had a 46 percent higher risk of developing prediabetes compared to low- or non-consumers over a 14-year period, according ...

Recommended for you

Sweet, bitter, fat: New study reveals impact of genetics on how kids snack

February 22, 2018
Whether your child asks for crackers, cookies or veggies to snack on could be linked to genetics, according to new findings from the Guelph Family Health Study at the University of Guelph.

The good and bad health news about your exercise posts on social media

February 22, 2018
We all have that Facebook friend—or 10—who regularly posts photos of his or her fitness pursuits: on the elliptical at the gym, hiking through the wilderness, crossing a 10K finish line.

Smartphones are bad for some teens, not all

February 21, 2018
Is the next generation better or worse off because of smartphones? The answer is complex and research shows it largely depends on their lives offline.

Tackling health problems in the young is crucial for their children's future

February 21, 2018
A child's growth and development is affected by the health and lifestyles of their parents before pregnancy - even going back to adolescence - according to a new study by researchers at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, ...

Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors': study

February 21, 2018
Significant amounts of toxic metals, including lead, leak from some e-cigarette heating coils and are present in the aerosols inhaled by users, according to a study from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public ...

Why teens need up to 10 hours' sleep

February 21, 2018
Technology, other distractions and staying up late make is difficult, but researchers say teenagers need to make time for 8-10 hours of sleep a night to optimise their performance and maintain good health and wellbeing.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.