FDA approves drug for autism irritability

October 13, 2006

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Risperdal to treat irritability in autistic children and adolescents.

This is the first time the FDA approved a drug to treat behavior-related problems associated with autism in children, the FDA said in a news release. The drug can be used to treat aggression, deliberate self-injury and temper tantrums, all of which are classified under irritability.

Risperdal is an anti-psychotic drug used to treat adults with schizophrenia, the FDA said. In 2003, it was also approved as a short-term treatment for adults with acute manic episodes or extreme mood swings.

Risperdal is manufactured by Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V. in Beerse, Belgium.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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