Hot flash study examines diabetes

October 9, 2006

A University of Texas researcher has received funding to study if menopausal hot flashes can be controlled similar to sugar levels -- by diet and exercise.

First, nursing assistant professor Sharon Dormire must determine whether a sudden drop in blood sugar levels causes hot flashes, which includes symptoms of sweating, interrupted sleep, memory problems and anxiety, the Austin (Texas) American-Statesman said. She said falling blood glucose can cause similar symptoms in diabetics.

If Dormire's theory proves true, women suffering hot flashes could avoid drug therapy and possibly treated by exercise and eating six small meals a day to even out their sugar levels.

Hot flashes affect eight in 10 menopausal women and usually are treated with hormonal therapy.

Dormire received a $218,000 grant for her research, the American-Statesman said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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