236,000 birds killed in flu outbreak

November 27, 2006

South Korea slaughtered 236,000 chickens and ducks after tests confirmed an outbreak of a highly virulent type of bird flu, the government said.

The government slaughtered the birds -- along with 300 pigs and 577 dogs -- within 1/3 mile of an infected farm in Iksan, in southwest South Korea, The Korea Times reported Sunday.

Authorities planned to kill additional animals within 2 miles of the Iksan farm and expand the surveillance boundaries to more than six miles, the newspaper said.

The government has already banned the movement of all chickens, birds and eggs within that 6-mile radius of the outbreak site.

Minister of Agriculture and Forestry Park Hong-soo said his department would compensate farmers for poultry slaughtered.

No person has been found to show flu symptoms, the government said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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