Laser treatment not effective for AMD

November 1, 2006

A U.S. study suggests low-intensity laser treatment for age-related macular degeneration is ineffective in slowing or preventing vision loss.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and 21 other clinical centers found the laser treatments that have been believed beneficial are actually ineffective in preventing complications of age-related macular degeneration, or AMD.

AMD is a disease that gradually destroys sharp, central vision that's needed for such common tasks as reading and driving.

"For the past 35 years, ophthalmologists have wondered about the advisability of employing preventive laser treatment for patients ... at a high risk for vision loss and AMD," said Dr. Stuart Fine, director of the university's department of ophthalmology. "We found that laser treatment had neither a clinically significant beneficial nor harmful effect for these patients."

The research was funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Medications with cosmetic benefits

Related Stories

Medications with cosmetic benefits

March 9, 2017

Good genes only go so far in resisting aging. For those who want to up their arsenal of beauty boosters, there is a range of over-the counter and prescription medications available to fight skin redness, wrinkles and other ...

Six things PCPs need to know about glaucoma

December 23, 2016

(HealthDay)—Primary care physicians are in a position to help with glaucoma diagnosis and management, according to an article published in the Ophthalmology Times.

Retinopathy of prematurity: New developments are cause for hope

January 17, 2017

A mini-symposium published in the Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) provides important insights into new techniques and treatments that show promise for eliminating retinopathy ...

Recommended for you

Study highlights risks of sepsis

March 21, 2017

A new study from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham analyzing three different methods for characterizing sepsis has helped to illustrate the risk of death or severe illness attributable to the condition. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.