Study looks at ethnic menopausal symptoms

December 7, 2006

A U.S. scientist is conducting a $1.2 million study of differences in menopausal symptoms reported by four of the most common U.S. ethnic groups.

Senior investigator Eun-Ok Im of the University of Texas at Austin School of Nursing said the National Institutes of Health-funded, Internet-based study will collect data from 500 middle-aged Caucasian, Hispanic, African-American and Asian women nationwide.

"Increasing ethnic diversity of our population requires health professionals to practice with greater cultural competence in areas such as the management of menopausal symptoms, where cultural beliefs mediate the biology of reproduction and aging," said Im.

A growing number of studies have challenged the universality of menopausal symptoms by indicating ethnic differences in how women experience them. For example, it has been reported Hispanic women experience more urinary problems and African-American women have more weight gain.

"All of this has been reported, but findings are inconsistent," Im said, adding she believes her study will present a more valid comparison because she is getting equal numbers of participants from each ethnic group.

The study is expected to be completed during 2009.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Study corrects the record on the relative risk of Alzheimer's between men and women

Related Stories

Study corrects the record on the relative risk of Alzheimer's between men and women

August 28, 2017
White women whose genetic makeup puts them at higher risk for Alzheimer's disease are more likely than white men to develop the disease during a critical 10-year span in their lives, according to a study headed by Keck School ...

Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?

September 5, 2017
The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

Early menopause associated with increased risk of heart disease, stroke

September 18, 2012
Women who go into early menopause are twice as likely to suffer from coronary heart disease and stroke, new Johns Hopkins-led research suggests.

Study ties early menopause to heart attack, stroke

September 28, 2012
Women who experience early menopause are more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than women whose menopause occurs at a later age, according to a new study by Melissa Wellons, M.D., assistant professor of Medicine in ...

Middle-aged women who were child abuse victims at increased risk for heart disease, diabetes

July 11, 2012
Middle-aged women who report having been physically abused as children are about two times more likely than other women their age to have high blood pressure, high blood sugar, a larger waistline and poor cholesterol levels, ...

Low calcium diet linked to higher risk of hormone condition in women

October 18, 2012
A low calcium diet is associated with a higher risk of developing a common hormone condition in women, known as primary hyperparathyroidism, suggests a study published on BMJ website today.

Recommended for you

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

'bench to bedside to bench': Scientists call for closer basic-clinical collaborations

March 24, 2017
In the era of genome sequencing, it's time to update the old "bench-to-bedside" shorthand for how basic research discoveries inform clinical practice, researchers from The Jackson Laboratory (JAX), National Human Genome Research ...

The ethics of tracking athletes' biometric data

January 18, 2017
(Medical Xpress)—Whether it is a FitBit or a heart rate monitor, biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.