Heart pioneer DeBakey survived own surgery

December 25, 2006

Pioneering U.S. heart surgeon Michael DeBakey is slowly getting back to work at age 98 after undergoing a surgery he himself developed.

Houston-based DeBakey was released from a hospital in September after becoming the oldest patient to survive surgery to repair a torn aorta, an outcome that proved elderly patients could weather the procedure.

The New York Times said Monday DeBakey, who also perfected coronary bypass surgery, was stricken about a year ago and admitted he never called his own doctor let alone 911.

"If it becomes intense enough, you're perfectly willing to accept cardiac arrest as a possible way of getting rid of the pain," he told The Times.

But following surgery and a long rehab period, DeBakey is working one day a week at

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Heart doctors repair coronary aneurysm without open surgery

Related Stories

Heart doctors repair coronary aneurysm without open surgery

February 16, 2012
(Medical Xpress) -- Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center interventional cardiologists have, for the first time, repaired a large coronary artery aneurysm with stent-assisted coil embolization without doing open heart ...

Getting smart about diabetic foot ulcers

February 8, 2017
While wearing appropriate footwear can help treat and prevent diabetic foot ulcers, the leading cause of limb amputation among people with diabetes, noncompliance continues to be an issue, especially among those with loss ...

Specific warning signs of complications in colorectal surgical patients released

February 7, 2013
Colorectal surgical patients are often discharged from the hospital with vague guidance on how to recognize complications, but researchers at the Michael DeBakey Veterans Administration (VA) Medical Center and Baylor College ...

New drugs might give heart patients an edge

March 11, 2013
(HealthDay)—In the search for better medicines to safely help heart patients, clinical trials testing three new drugs appear to offer some promise.

Easing dystonia symptoms with deep brain stimulation

May 5, 2015
Michael Richardson first experienced symptoms of dystonia, a movement disorder characterized by involuntary muscle contractions and spasms, when he was 13.

Aide says Cheney had heart transplant

March 25, 2012
(AP) -- Former Vice President Dick Cheney had a heart transplant Saturday, after five heart attacks over the past 25 years and countless medical procedures to keep him going. Cheney, 71, waited nearly two years for his new ...

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.