Study shows jet lag may be harmful

December 27, 2006

A study done on mice has shown that jet lag may not only be a nuisance to frequent fliers but it could be al health risk.

The University of Virginia released the study that showed that a majority of the elderly mice they were testing died while being subjected to the equivalent of a flight from Washington-to-Paris once a week for eight weeks, The Washington Post reported.

Jet lag is usually accompanied by grogginess, burning eyes, headaches, insomnia and fatigue. Experts said that the study is the first real scientific look into the effect of jet lag.

The study found that intense forms of jet lag sped up the death rate in mice. New attention has been focused on the problem and questions are being raised about whether severe jet lag can be harmful to frequent fliers' health.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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