Indonesia will share bird flu virus

March 2, 2007

Indonesia says it will once again share bird flu virus samples with the World Health Organization.

Officials in Jakarta in February stopped sending bird flu samples to WHO because WHO then gave samples to drug companies, which used the samples to make vaccines that they then sold, ANTARA News reported.

Under a new deal with WHO, the agency will only use Indonesian bird flu samples for risk assessment and will not share them with companies. Any company that wants a sample of Indonesia's bird flu virus will have to ask Jakarta, ANTARA said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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