New study warns about multitasking

March 26, 2007

Several reports published in the United States are highlighting the limits of multitasking in the office and beyond.

The New York Times reported on the recent findings, gleaned from numerous studies conducted by neuroscientists, psychologists and management professors, who suggest that people should slow down on their multitasking when working in an office, studying or driving a car.

Some researchers said driving is the most dangerous time to multitask, as a one-second delay could be fatal.

Rene Marois, a neuroscientist and director of the Human Information Processing Laboratory at Vanderbilt University, told the Times that one of the problems is that people tend to think the brain can handle more than it really can at one time.

Multitasking is believed to be especially prevalent among teenagers and young workers in their 20s who are overall most adept to the latest technology.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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