Prof: People should mull over how much wine, beer they pour

April 24, 2007

While many people are aware of the potential health hazards posed by oversized food servings, a Purdue University expert says consumers face the same risks at the neighborhood bar as they do at a buffet bar.

"The overconsumption syndrome in this country is not only about food, but alcohol's portion sizes as well," says Julia Chester, an assistant professor of psychological sciences. "There is a lack of knowledge about standard drink sizes and that leads to consuming too many calories and experiencing alcohol's harmful effects."

Among those are alcohol dependency, as well as long-term and short-term cognitive effects that can lead to impaired judgment, says Chester, who studies the role of genetics in alcohol withdrawal and how stress influences alcohol consumption. Binge drinking - exceeding the number of recommended drinks in a short period of time - can damage the brain and liver.

"People do not know how to assess how much they are drinking, and when they have two drinks on a Friday night, it is really four or five because there are multiple doses in one giant cup," Chester says. "Two 44-ounce servings are very different from two 12-ounce servings."

The standard drink size is 12 ounces for beer, 5 ounces for wine and 1.5 ounces of 80 proof alcohol, Chester says.

Some people are ordering larger drinks or pitchers of alcohol at restaurants because it is promoted as a good deal.

"It may be a good deal for your wallet, but it's costly for your body," she says. "We are drinking our calories, not just with alcohol, but with soft drinks, coffee beverages and sport drinks that have so-called nutrients. Research is showing that people cannot regulate calories well when they are in liquid form. In addition, intoxication and the post-ingestive effects of alcohol disrupt people's ability to regulate calorie intake."

Source: Purdue University

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

Your dishwasher is not as sterile as you think

January 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Your dishwasher may get those plates spotless, but it is also probably teeming with bacteria and fungus, a new study suggests.

Study reveals what sleep talkers have to say

January 12, 2018
A team of researchers with members from several institutions in France has conducted a study regarding sleep talking and has found that most sleep talking is not only negative in nature, but involves a large amount of swearing. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.