Cincy homeless shelter hit with TB

May 6, 2007

Health officials in Cincinnati are tracking down hundreds of homeless people who may have been exposed to tuberculosis at a downtown shelter.

Seven people have been confirmed as having the disease while as many as 600 others may have been exposed, The Cincinnati Post said Saturday.

The tuberculosis outbreak was first detected in February at the Drop Inn Center, the Queen City's largest homeless shelter. So far, about 200 guests have been tested.

Officials said at a news conference Friday that there was no immediate danger to the general population, but TB could spread in places like shelters and jails and among people with weakened immune systems.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: U.S. tuberculosis cases hit record low, CDC says

Related Stories

U.S. tuberculosis cases hit record low, CDC says

March 22, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Tuberculosis rates fell to an all-time low in the United States in 2011, but the disease continues to disproportionately infect racial and ethnic minorities, those who are foreign-born and people infected with ...

Screening for latent tuberculosis infection recommended for those at increased risk

September 6, 2016
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for latent tuberculosis infection in populations at increased risk. People who are considered at increased risk include people who were born in or have ...

Screen high-risk adults for tuberculosis, experts say

March 8, 2016
(HealthDay)—Adults at greater risk for latent tuberculosis infection should be screened for the condition, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends.

London uses van with X-ray machine to find TB

October 23, 2013
London is famed for its historic sites, its double-decker buses and its West End shows, but the city now has a more dubious distinction: Britain's public health agency says it has become the tuberculosis capital of Western ...

JAMA editorial highlights challenges of implementing new TB screening guidelines

September 6, 2016
An editorial in the Sept. 6, 2016 issue of JAMA accompanies the publication of new US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) screening recommendations for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection in primary care settings. The ...

Identifying children and saving lives one thumbprint at a time

September 29, 2016
Every day 353,000 children are born around the world, a majority of them in developing countries where there is a lack of proper record keeping, resulting in a lack of proper health care. By the age of five, more than 5 million ...

Recommended for you

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.