N.H. finds voluntary vaccination works

May 13, 2007

New Hampshire says it has a winning formula for getting teenage girls vaccinated against a virus linked to cervical cancer -- make the shot voluntary.

The state is supplying the vaccine against the human papilloma virus free to girls ages 11 to 18. As a result, many doctors have waiting lists for the vaccine, The New York Times reported.

While Virginia is the only state that requires vaccination, with an opt-out for parents, many states have considered laws that would make it mandatory. The vaccine, marketed as Gardasil, is controversial, with some critics saying that protecting women from a sexually transmitted disease encourages promiscuity and others doubtful about long-term effects.

"I suspect that we're not seeing a significant controversy because there was a never a discussion about whether to make this mandatory," Greg Moore, a spokesman for the New Hampshire Health and Human Services Department, told the Times.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Implications of mandatory flu vaccinations for health-care workers

Related Stories

Implications of mandatory flu vaccinations for health-care workers

May 26, 2014
Employers planning to implement mandatory influenza vaccination policies for health care workers need to understand the implications, according to an analysis published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

Automated tracking increases compliance of flu vaccination for health-care personnel

October 22, 2014
New research found tracking influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel through an automated system increased vaccination compliance and reduced workload burden on human resources and occupational health staff. The study ...

Neglect of 'science communication environment' puts vaccine acceptance at risk

October 3, 2013
The biggest threat to the contribution that childhood vaccines make to societal well-being doesn't come from deficits in public comprehension, distrust of science, or misinformation campaigns, but rather from the failure ...

Why are so few kids getting the HPV vaccine?

April 8, 2016
Ten years after the federal government approved the first vaccines to combat the cancer-causing human papillomavirus, nine years after those vaccines were recommended for all adolescent girls, and five years after they were ...

HPV vaccination not linked to riskier sex

February 9, 2015
Receiving the human papillomavirus vaccine does not increase rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in adolescent females. The vaccine, which can prevent cervical cancer in women, has had a low uptake, partly because ...

Vaccination responsible for dramatic fall in salmonella infections

January 16, 2013
Mass poultry vaccination programmes introduced to combat Salmonella infections have led to a dramatic fall in the number of cases since the late 1990s, according to a researcher at the University of Liverpool.

Recommended for you

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

Team eradicates hepatitis C in 10 patients following lifesaving transplants from infected donors

April 30, 2017
Ten patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease. The findings point to new strategies for increasing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.