Viagra sales don't meet expectations

May 20, 2007

While sales of erectile dysfunction drugs like Viagra have been steady since their release, their popularity has not met expectations, the Miami Herald said.

The newspaper Saturday reported while initial annual sales estimates for Viagra alone were around $5 billion, the total sales of the top three erectile medications have totaled $3 billion a year.

While sales of the drugs have been somewhat disappointing, they have been credited by some with making erectile dysfunction a less embarrassing medical condition.

"Before Viagra, a lot of men with erection problems were angry and withdrawn in their relationships," sex counselor Dr. Judy Kuriansky said. "They didn't want sex; their partners didn't know what was going on; the women blamed themselves, and it was a mess."

The Herald said that failure of the drug to work for all men may be behind the medication's lack of success as erections only occur in two out of three men when the problem has an organic basis.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Pfizer considers consumer business sale

Related Stories

Pfizer considers consumer business sale

October 10, 2017
Pfizer may be done selling ChapStick, Advil, Robitussin and other brands that people can buy without a prescription.

Bashful? Buy the little blue pill online (Update)

May 6, 2013
Pfizer Inc., in a first for the drug industry, told The Associated Press that the drugmaker will begin selling its popular erectile dysfunction pill Viagra directly to patients on its website.

Viagra ads target women for first time

September 30, 2014
The maker of the world's top-selling erectile dysfunction drug on Tuesday will begin airing the first Viagra TV commercial in America that targets the less-obvious sufferers of the sexual condition: women.

Most men with erectile dysfunction don't seem to get treatment

May 6, 2013
(HealthDay)—Never mind the commercials with men talking freely to their doctor about their erectile dysfunction, taking a prescription for treatment to the pharmacy and settling in for a romantic evening.

Pfizer, Teva reach deal to allow generic Viagra

December 17, 2013
Pfizer says it reached a settlement with Teva Pharmaceuticals that allows the generic drugmaker to launch a copycat version of its popular erectile dysfunction drug Viagra in 2017.

Experts warn over Nigerian 'viagra' drinks

March 24, 2014
Nike Ajibade and three of her colleagues sit on a Lagos pavement with small plastic bottles of liquids tucked inside weather-beaten plastic buckets.

Recommended for you

Fighting opioid addiction in primary care—new study shows it's possible

October 18, 2017
For many of the 2 million Americans addicted to opioids, getting good treatment and getting off prescription painkillers or heroin may seem like a far-off dream.

With no morphine, 25 million die in pain each year: report

October 13, 2017
Every year, some 25 million people—one in ten of them children—die in serious pain that could have been alleviated with morphine at just a few cents per dose, researchers said Friday.

Study finds few restrictions on Rx opioids through Medicare

October 9, 2017
Medicare plans place few restrictions on the coverage of prescription opioids, despite federal guidelines recommending such restrictions, a new Yale study finds. The research results highlight an untapped opportunity for ...

Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects?

October 5, 2017
Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads."

Pre-packaged brand version of compounded medication to prevent preterm births costs 5,000 percent more

October 2, 2017
Preventing a preterm birth could cost as little as $200 or as much as $20,000, depending on which one of two medications a doctor orders, according to a new analysis from Harvard Medical School.

Cancer drugs' high prices not justified by cost of development, study contends

September 12, 2017
(HealthDay)— Excusing the sky-high price tags of many new cancer treatments, pharmaceutical companies often blame high research and development (R&D) costs.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.