A little anger might be a good thing

June 28, 2007

A California study says a little anger can help people make better decisions.

Researchers at the University of California-Santa Barbara said getting "miffed or irked" can sharpen a person's ability to analyze data carefully and make the right decisions, ABC News said Wednesday.

The study was published in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

Psychologist Wesley G. Moons and a colleague put students through a series of experiments to see if they could "think straight while seeing red," ABC News said.

Some students were insulted or provoked, causing them to describe themselves as angry. Others were asked to recall something that made them angry. Both groups were then asked to solve a problem or analyze data to see how anger impacted their judgment.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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