Sleep deprivation affects eye-steering coordination when driving

June 11, 2007

WESTCHESTER, Ill. – Driving a vehicle requires coordination of horizontal eye movements and steering. A research abstract that will be presented Monday at SLEEP 2007, the 21st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies (APSS), finds that even a single night of sleep deprivation can impact a person's ability to coordinate eye movements with steering.

The study, authored by Mark Chattington of Manchester Metropolitan University, focused on six participants, who drove a winding route on a driving simulator. On the first day, they drove for one hour starting at 5 p.m. The subjects were kept awake the following night, and on day two, drove again at 5 p.m. for up to two-and-a-half hours. Their eye movements were monitored using a dashboard mounted eye tracker, and steering wheel movement was monitored through a precision potentiometer attached to the steering column.

The results showed that, in all drivers, sleep deprivation adversely affected their ability to coordinate eye movements when steering. There were instances of both acute and chronic reductions in the degree of coordination and in the time lead of eye movements over steering.

"The analysis of eye-steering coordination may provide a useful method of detecting when a driver is in danger of losing control of a vehicle due to fatigue, before the driver actually falls asleep," said Chattington.

The amount of sleep a person gets affects his or her physical health, emotional well-being, mental abilities, productivity and performance. Recent studies associate lack of sleep with serious health problems such as an increased risk of depression, obesity, cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Source: American Academy of Sleep Medicine

Explore further: Eye tracking might help reduce driver drowsiness

Related Stories

Eye tracking might help reduce driver drowsiness

February 6, 2018
A new way of detecting driver drowsiness by tracking eye movement could help reduce the road toll, a world-first study has found.

What do you know about Parkinson's disease?

January 31, 2018
Parkinson's disease is a progressive disorder of the nervous system that affects movement. It develops gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. But while a tremor may be the most well-known ...

Sleepy drivers may be causing more crashes than thought

February 8, 2018
(HealthDay)—Driver fatigue causes many more car accidents in the United States than previously estimated, a new report suggests.

With wrist-worn gadget, researchers capture real-life sleep for the first time

December 28, 2017
To measure a person's sleep, researchers have always relied on costly and time-consuming approaches that could only be used in a sleep lab. But now researchers reporting in Current Biology on December 28 have found a way ...

Map of brain cell activity may help us control when we sleep

January 22, 2018
For many people who struggle to get a good night's rest, being able to switch on and off the brain circuits that control sleep would be a life-changer. The good news is that's exactly what scientists hope to do, but first ...

Restless sleep may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease

December 6, 2017
Restless sleep could be a sign of a disorder associated with diseases of the brain. Researchers from Aarhus University conducted a case-control study on the condition of the dopamine-producing nerve cells in the brain and ...

Recommended for you

Best of Last Year—The top Medical Xpress articles of 2017

December 20, 2017
It was a good year for medical research as a team at the German center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Magdeburg, found that dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain. Any exercise helps, the team found, but dancing ...

Pickled in 'cognac', Chopin's heart gives up its secrets

November 26, 2017
The heart of Frederic Chopin, among the world's most cherished musical virtuosos, may finally have given up the cause of his untimely death.

Sugar industry withheld evidence of sucrose's health effects nearly 50 years ago

November 21, 2017
A U.S. sugar industry trade group appears to have pulled the plug on a study that was producing animal evidence linking sucrose to disease nearly 50 years ago, researchers argue in a paper publishing on November 21 in the ...

Female researchers pay more attention to sex and gender in medicine

November 7, 2017
When women participate in a medical research paper, that research is more likely to take into account the differences between the way men and women react to diseases and treatments, according to a new study by Stanford researchers.

Drug therapy from lethal bacteria could reduce kidney transplant rejection

August 3, 2017
An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai.

Exploring the potential of human echolocation

June 25, 2017
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.