FDA issues supplement rules

June 23, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued new government standards for the manufacture of vitamins and dietary supplements.

The standards are intended to ensure that dietary supplements "are produced in a quality manner, do not contain contaminants or impurities, and are accurately labeled," the FDA said Friday in a release.

"This rule helps to ensure the quality of dietary supplements so that consumers can be confident that the products they purchase contain what is on the label," said Commissioner of Food and Drugs Andrew C. von Eschenbach. "In addition, as a result of recent amendments to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, by the end of the year, industry will be required to report all serious dietary supplement related adverse events to FDA."

The FDA said the agency is trying to prevent inclusion of the wrong ingredients; too much or too little of a dietary ingredient; contamination by substances such as natural toxins, bacteria, pesticides, glass, lead and other heavy metals; as well as improper packaging and labeling.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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