Holograms make for better vision tests

July 5, 2007

A new paper published in the July 1 issue of OSA's Optics Letters shows that researchers in Australia have created a new one-step test that uses holograms to diagnose the astigmatic error of the human eye, a key measurement in determining the appropriate prescriptions for eye glasses in patients.

This new technique adds to an earlier one, developed by the same researchers, for using a single hologram to measure another important property, the spherical refractive error of the eye.

In this new test, patients view a hologram consisting of sunburst patterns; by reporting which sunburst lines appear clearest, the eye doctor can obtain information he or she can use in determining the correct prescription for the patient.

Traditionally, patients look through a series of lenses until they find which one gives each eye the clearest view of a distant target such as an eye chart on a wall. This multi-step process of finding the right lens can be cumbersome and complex. Holography offers many advantages including simplicity, high speed and low cost and could open new doors in our understanding of human vision.

This approach still needs to be tested on young astigmatic individuals, whose nature of vision is not fully known. The same method has also been found to work well in measuring the refractive error of non-astigmatic subjects.

The results of that research will appear in a future issue of OSA’s journal JOSA-A.

Citation: "Holographic multivergence target for subjective measurement of the astigmatic error of the human eye," Optics Letters, Vol. 32, Issue 13, pp. 1926-1928.

Source: Optical Society of America

Explore further: PolyU optometry study finds astigmatism prevalent among Hongkongers

Related Stories

PolyU optometry study finds astigmatism prevalent among Hongkongers

June 27, 2012
Nearly one out of 10 people between 21 to 30 years old have astigmatism more than 200 degrees (2.00D), according to the latest findings on a clinical population by optometry experts at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University ...

'Internal astigmatism' doesn't compensate for changes in the eye over time

August 29, 2016
For people with nearsightedness (myopia), the lens doesn't compensate for growth or other changes in the structure of the eye, according to a long-term follow-up study in the September issue of Optometry and Vision Science, ...

Wearing glasses improves reading fluency for kids with 'high' astigmatism

January 27, 2016
For children with severe astigmatism, wearing glasses to correct blurred vision can significantly improve accurate reading speed, reports a study in the February issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of ...

Eyes on the sun: Child sunshine exposure and eye development

May 21, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Exposure to sunshine as a small child is crucial to the development of a healthy eye according to results of long-term myopia study conducted by University of Sydney researchers.

Nine signs children may need an eye exam

September 8, 2017
Back-to-school shopping lists might include school supplies, new clothes, and even a haircut, but does it include an eye exam? Physicians in the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Ophthalmology think it should.

On the cutting edge of laser eye surgery

June 1, 2011
Hindsight, unlike many people's vision, is always 20/20. Laser eye surgery has become so common, it's easy to forget that just three decades ago a promising new treatment was greeted with skepticism and even fear.

Recommended for you

Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it starts

January 16, 2018
For anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain.

Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease risk

January 16, 2018
Massive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases.

Blood-vessel-on-a-chip provides insight into new anti-inflammatory drug candidate

January 15, 2018
One of the most important and fraught processes in the human body is inflammation. Inflammatory responses to injury or disease are crucial for recruiting the immune system to help the body heal, but inflammation can also ...

Molecule produced by fat cells reduces obesity and diabetes in mice

January 15, 2018
UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a new biological pathway in fat cells that could explain why some people with obesity are at high risk for metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. The new findings—demonstrated ...

Obese fat becomes inflamed and scarred, which may make weight loss harder

January 12, 2018
The fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found.

Optimized human peptide found to be an effective antibacterial agent

January 11, 2018
A team of researchers in the Netherlands has developed an effective antibacterial ointment based on an optimized human peptide. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes developing ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.