U.S. sales of morning-after pill double

July 13, 2007

Sales of the morning-after pill Plan B in the United States have doubled since it was made available without a prescription.

Drug maker Barr Pharmaceuticals said sales will probably be close to $80 million for 2007, The Washington Post said Friday.

The Food and Drug Administration approved the sale of the controversial emergency contraceptive without a prescription for women 18 and older last August.

Women's health and family-planning advocates say it illustrates the value of easing access to birth control to help prevent unwanted pregnancies, the newspaper said.

Conservative groups, however, question the drug's safety and maintain the pill can cause the equivalent of an abortion.

Advocates would like to see the FDA remove the age restriction.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Tackling the rising sale of unapproved antibiotics in India

Related Stories

Tackling the rising sale of unapproved antibiotics in India

October 10, 2017
Indian government needs to do more to tackle rising sale of unapproved antibiotics, according to an analysis by researchers at Newcastle University and Queen Mary University of London.

Girl's HIV infection seems under control without AIDS drugs

July 24, 2017
A South African girl born with the AIDS virus has kept her infection suppressed for more than eight years after stopping anti-HIV medicines—more evidence that early treatment can occasionally cause a long remission that, ...

Drug regulations tied to fewer prescriptions of effective gout drug

April 9, 2015
Well intentioned, but costly and potentially problematic. That's how researchers describe the end result of a decision by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate colchicine, a drug used to treat gout, among other ...

How OxyContin became America's most widely abused prescription drug

May 16, 2016
The drugmaker Purdue Pharma launched OxyContin two decades ago with a bold marketing claim: One dose relieves pain for 12 hours, more than twice as long as generic medications.

Report: DEA records show West Virginia flooded with drugs

December 19, 2016
Drug wholesalers shipped 780 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills to West Virginia in just six years, a period when 1,728 people fatally overdosed on these two painkillers, according to an investigation by the Charlotte ...

Miracle diet pill? A safe drug is elusive

February 24, 2012
(AP) -- The battle of the bulge has been a big, fat failure for U.S. drugmakers. But that hasn't stopped them from trying.

Recommended for you

With no morphine, 25 million die in pain each year: report

October 13, 2017
Every year, some 25 million people—one in ten of them children—die in serious pain that could have been alleviated with morphine at just a few cents per dose, researchers said Friday.

Study finds few restrictions on Rx opioids through Medicare

October 9, 2017
Medicare plans place few restrictions on the coverage of prescription opioids, despite federal guidelines recommending such restrictions, a new Yale study finds. The research results highlight an untapped opportunity for ...

Nocebo effect: Does a drug's high price tag cause its own side effects?

October 5, 2017
Pricey drugs may make people more vulnerable to perceiving side effects, a new study suggests—and the phenomenon is not just "in their heads."

Pre-packaged brand version of compounded medication to prevent preterm births costs 5,000 percent more

October 2, 2017
Preventing a preterm birth could cost as little as $200 or as much as $20,000, depending on which one of two medications a doctor orders, according to a new analysis from Harvard Medical School.

Cancer drugs' high prices not justified by cost of development, study contends

September 12, 2017
(HealthDay)— Excusing the sky-high price tags of many new cancer treatments, pharmaceutical companies often blame high research and development (R&D) costs.

Non-psychotropic cannabinoids show promise for pain relief

September 4, 2017
Some cancers love bone. They thrive in its nutrient-rich environment while gnawing away at the very substrate that sustains them, all the while releasing inflammatory substances that cause pain—pain so severe that opioids ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.