Edinburgh rabbit owners warned of disease

August 8, 2007

Pet rabbit owners in Edinburgh, Scotland, have been warned they are at risk of contracting a deadly virus during this warm, wet summer.

The weather has led to an increase in the fleas that spread myxomatosis. Veterinarians say there are more wild rabbits around the capital now, creating a reservoir of infection.

"Basically, the disease doesn't always kill wild rabbits now and they can carry it for some time," Dr. Donald Mctaggart told The Scotsman. "So when a flea bites it and gets the blood in it, then later bites a domestic pet -- which is defenseless against it -- the pet rabbit dies."

Mactaggart urged rabbit owners to get their pets vaccinated against the disease. He described the symptoms as horrible and said the disease often has a long incubation period, showing up weeks after a bite from a flea carrying the disease.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Does your pet have a weight problem? Here's how to tell

Related Stories

Does your pet have a weight problem? Here's how to tell

November 10, 2017
(HealthDay)—Cats with diabetes, dogs with cancer, birds with high cholesterol or even rabbits who cannot turn around to clean themselves—what do these animals all have in common?

If your pet has this tapeworm, it could kill you

December 4, 2017
Dogs are sending us an early warning signal about the spread of a potentially deadly tapeworm in North America.

Diseases prompt caution from veterinary laboratory director

August 12, 2015
Tularemia, plague, West Nile virus, rabies, vesicular stomatitis—Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory (WSVL) experts are cautioning residents to monitor not only their pets and livestock, but also themselves this summer.

Spotting eye problems in pets

October 13, 2014
Pets don't have to read an eye chart to keep a driver's license or don prescription glasses to see the tiny text on a smartphone. But they still need eye care. In fact, animals experience many of the same eye problems that ...

Pythons apparently wiping out Everglades mammals

January 30, 2012
A burgeoning population of huge pythons - many of them pets that were turned loose by their owners when they got too big - appears to be wiping out large numbers of raccoons, opossums, bobcats and other mammals in the Everglades, ...

Animals as healers

January 27, 2014
Outside the assisted-living complex, Penny and Boo act like any dogs their age. Full of energy, 2-year-old Penny bounces around the sidewalk, antics that seem to mildly irritate the more dignified Boo, 7.

Recommended for you

New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD risk

January 16, 2018
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk ...

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic

January 16, 2018
While past exposure to influenza A viruses often builds immunity to similar, and sometimes different, strains of the virus, Canadian researchers are calling for more attention to exceptions to that rule.

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses

January 11, 2018
Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.