Cholera confirmed in Baghdad

September 21, 2007

At least one case of cholera has been reported in Baghdad, raising concern that the epidemic in northern Iraq is spreading south.

Approximately 7,000 people have been infected by the disease, which is being spread by the country's decrepit water system, The New York Times said Thursday.

The World Health Organization and the Iraqi Red Crescent Society have confirmed a case involving a 25-year-old woman living in Baghdad. There could be at least two others cases, hospital sources told the newspaper.

Mass displacement of the population has pushed many people into unsanitary living conditions in which food and water can become tainted with sewage and spread the cholera bacteria, health officials said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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