Study: U.K. physicians are better trained

October 22, 2007

An increasing number of new British physicians report their medical school training prepared them well for their first clinical posts.

The researchers, led by Judith Cave of the University College Medical School in London, sent questionnaires to all doctors newly qualified from U.K. medical schools. More than half responded, saying their experience at medical school had prepared them well for their first year of employment. A similar survey conducted in 2000-2001 found only about third of such physicians considered themselves prepared for their first year of work.

The researchers said their findings suggest changes in curriculum and teaching methods at most medical schools are beginning to have an impact.

The study appears online in the journal BMC Medical Education.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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