Tamiflu touted for child use

November 16, 2007

The maker of the anti-viral Tamiflu said the drug is effective for treatment and prevention of influenza in young children.

Data presented at the World Society for Pediatric Infectious Disease meeting in Bangkok this week said Tamiflu (oseltamivir) significantly reduces illness severity and duration of influenza in children ages 1 and older, particularly if given within 24 hours of symptom onset, Roche pharmaceuticals said Thursday in a release.

Roche pharmaceuticals said it will offer child-sized Tamiflu capsules of 30 mg and 45 mg doses to provide easier and more convenient dosing by parents.

The company said Tamiflu was shown to reduce influenza severity by 52 percent, and illness duration was reduced by 34 percent if treatment was started within 24 hours of onset.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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