Artificial skin system can heal wounds

December 20, 2007

A new study in Artificial Organs tested the effects of a wound dressing created with hair follicular cells. The findings reveal that skin substitutes using living hair cells can increase wound healing.

Researchers applied the technique to wound surfaces on mice. Subjects that were administered this biological dressing produced two times better wound closure than the control set.

The technique not only provides the proper environment for cell attachment and growth, but also serves as an effective biodressing to keep wounds moist and maintain structural strength during healing. “This technique shows promise as a biological dressing that is not only efficient and strong but also can be produced with less time and effort,” says Jung Chul Kim, lead author of the study.

The use of skin substitutes for wound healing has suffered setbacks in recent years due to the expensive price. However, this method of wound dressing improves early-stage wound healing and reduces the time between preparation and patient use.

Source: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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