Mexican 'Barrilito' syrup candy recalled

December 12, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced the recall of imported Mexican "Barrilito" candy because of a health hazard.

Villa-Mex Imports Inc. of San Antonio said laboratory testing found the syrup candy contained elevated levels of lead that could produce health problems.

Barrilito, a dark brown thick syrup, was sold in 3.3 ounce (100 gram) glass barrel-shaped jars with white plastic lids. The yellow label shows the name "Barrilito" in red outline letters. The label also reads: Productos Avila, S.A. de C.V. Puerto Malaque 1379 Col. Sta. Maria Guadalajara, Jal. Mexico."

The FDA said eating products containing lead can be especially harmful to infants, young children and pregnant women. Consumers were advised to discard the recalled product or return it to the store where it was purchased.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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